Why Women Struggle at Learning a New Sport and How to Get Past It

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I teach adults to ski and, while everyone’s different, there are some big differences between teaching men and women to ski. A common one—women are a lot more afraid to fail than the men. They are also a lot less confident in their skill—even though the men lack the same skills. Women HATE to be the one who stands out, who slows down the group. So what causes this and what can we do about it?

Continue reading “Why Women Struggle at Learning a New Sport and How to Get Past It”

Being Athletic and Feminine

A tweet went the rounds this week quoting an accomplished female athlete. She was asked in an interview if there was anything she didn’t play as a child and her derisive response, “Dolls.” As my finger hovered over the retweet button, I thought, But what’s wrong with playing with dolls?

Lately in society we are presented with two type of women: the princess type with a hair never out of place who wears heels everywhere and the nerd or athlete who eschews all things feminine. Continue reading “Being Athletic and Feminine”

Becoming Athletic

When people find out I ski, do triathlons, and a host of other outdoor stuff, they say, “Wow, you’re so athletic. I wish I could do that.” Here’s my deep down dark secret, I’m not athletic at all. When I hit my first steep turn mountain biking, I panicked, slammed on my brakes and tipped over. It took two months for me to get up on water skis. My triathlon swims usually end with me belching my way through the bike ride because of all the water I swallowed. The first season I skied, I was the only one in class who could tip over standing still. Here’s a little something I learned about becoming athletic. Continue reading “Becoming Athletic”

Skiing Topless

In honor of the last week of ski season, I am telling my most embarrassing ski story of the year.

Since I teach young children to ski, I had to get a tuberculosis test. Now a TB test consists of being pricked in your arm and then having it checked 48 hours later to see if there’s any reaction. The check must be done by a doctor in that timeframe or you have to get pricked again.

Day 3 of my training to be a ski instructor was supposed to be an all day, indoor affair that was offsite from the resort. All that meant to me was that I wouldn’t ski on opening day. However, they released us at 2:00 with the promise we would have our arms checked by ski patrol.

Continue reading “Skiing Topless”

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